This is the seventh in a series of posts on the automotive restoration of this 1964 Porsche 356C.  Part One described condition of the Porsche after media blasting and the rebuild of the B-post, Part Two explains the fender reconstruction process, Part Three covered the front end reconstruction, Part Four described the rebuild of the right-hand front fender and wheel arch, and Part Five covers the difficult restoration of the right-hand rear quarter .  Part Six demonstrated how off-the-shelf panels were used to make quick work of the restoration of the engine bay.

 

This post takes us to the final stage of finishing the metal work: the leading (or lead loading) process.   A total of approximately 280 hours was spent on the metal work piece of the restoration, in preparation for the lead work.  The links above only cover part of the body restoration work, after this lead post, we’ll continue with more information on the other metal work that was completed on this Porsche, including new floors and and the front structure rebuild.

 

This type of Porsche was factory leaded, typically around the door jams to define the door gaps, hood gaps, and trunk lid gaps.  Throughout a cars history, especially a car of this age, it has probably been involved in an accident or two, so the body becomes a little out of line with the bolt on panels (doors, hood, trunk, etc).  This creates uneven and unattractive gapping.  This is where leading comes to save the day in these areas and resurrect the correct gapping.  As our Porsche is nearly 50 years old, there are other areas we will consider doing lead work, such as areas that we cannot gain behind panel access with a hammer and dolly (to aid removal of dents/ metal finish) so the next best thing is to lead these areas.  The best thing about lead, if done correctly, it will last a lifetime.  This creates enormous value in the car, versus using plastic fillers (even the good ones on the markets today).  Leading also keeps in line with the tradition of how these fine vehicles were built.

After the initial media blasting, once the car was disassembled, there is always a fraction of the original factory lead surface erased.  Therefore there is always a small percentage of lead we have to replace to get back to our original shapes.   Follow the pictures below of the lead work performed on the 1964 Porsche 356C.  This took 40 hours from start to completion.  Bringing us to total hours spent in metal work and lead restoration:  320.

 

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Metal work complete and ready for lead work. Areas to be addressed: all gaps and historical lead work. Prior to lead work we media dust the body to eliminate grease and oil build up from the metal restoration process.

 

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Heat source used is propane with a soft flame torch head. Remember to wear a mask!

Restoration leading performed around the trunk lid gaps

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Prepping the metal to lead with flux (to adhere the lead to the metal body). Acts as a bonding agent.

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Lead work begins on the right-hand rear quarter.

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Blending body to surface area of the trunk lid.

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Filing of the lead begins to smooth the surface and blend it into the body.

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Defining work continues.

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Maintaining the correct shape and flow of the shape is important.

Final photos of the trunk lid area restoration

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End result of the rear right-hand corner. Gaps are defined for an even flow.

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The edges showing a slight radius. It’s important to get this correct in the early stages in preparation for paint.

Restoration leading the door gaps of the Porsche

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Moving onto leading the door apertures and fading the lead into the body.

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Lead work performed and defined on both left and right-hand doors.

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Close up of the final door gapping. Attention to detail again on the radius left on the edge.

Lead work photos on the hood gaps

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Lead work performed on the front aperture.

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Close up of the beginning stages of the lead work. Lead that has just been laid down.

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Closing stages of completing the front.

Close-up of final results of the hood gapping restoration

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Final gapping of the front hood. Not only do the gaps have to be correct, but the hood surface has to be level with the body.

Stay tuned for more posts and progress on this Porsche 356C!  Check out our services provided at our fully equipped work shop in Denver, Colorado.

This is the seventh in a series of posts on the automotive restoration of this 1964 Porsche 356C.  Part One described condition of the Porsche after media blasting and the rebuild of the B-post, Part Two explains the fender reconstruction process, Part Three covered the front end reconstruction, Part Four described the rebuild of the right-hand front fender and wheel arch, and Part Five covers the difficult restoration of the right-hand rear quarter .  Part Six demonstrated how off-the-shelf panels were used to make quick work of the restoration of the engine bay.

 

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